About your Search

20130122
20130122
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and i said you should put shooting at the top of the list. we have been through aurora, the sikh temple, the oregon shopping mall, think about this, this is before we got to sandy hook. in newtown. we'd had a time of ab
sandy relief efforts. we'll have live coverage of the senate when they return at 2:15 eastern here on c-span2. going to take you live next acrosstown in washington to the democratic national committee and their winter meeting about to get underway. they're going to hear from democratic national committee chairman, debbie debbie wasserman schultz. it should get underway shortly here on c-span2. democratic national committee chairman debbie wasserman schultz will speak shortly talking about the democratic party's agenda and challenges ahead for the 113th congress. we'll have live coverage when she gets underway on c-span2. a look at the agenda ahead in transportics with secretary ray a are hood who called on congress to pass a five-year long-term transportation bill. [applause] >> hello, everybody. thank you very much. good noontime to all of you and thank you for including me again in your program. i want to ask all of our dot team gathered for lunch to stand up and be recognized. all dot stand up and be recognized. [applause] thank you all. thank you. i know that trb wouldn't be what it
happy during sandy. we are able to do things to raise through covenant house and the cooperation of extorting people that went into raised a lot of money, because it actually doesn't take that much money to give a person or doorway of hope. and the last thing i will say on this is, you know, for me i get very upset because when i first became mayor i had a metaphor that i clung to. i used to tell people such an optimistic hopeful person companies to tell people i'm a prisoner of hope. when we walked into city hall seven years ago there were so many challenges and i would try to gird my team up and say we are prisoners of hope. we do nothing but hope. now seven years later my metaphor seems to have changed because i see powerfully transforming things -- happening from the largest parks expansion in century from a down housing market, to double the production of affordable housing, first time in 60 years the populace is going down, it's going up. hotels in downtown and 40 years. so my metaphor has changed and i tell people i'm no longer a prisoner of hope. i am unhinged because i n
try to spend their money in a wiser, built-to-last kind of way. that's what the sandy supplemental allows. it also allows the state to draw down a portion of its hazard mitigation funding from fema in order to leverage mitigation opportunities earlier in the construction process. in the old days, it would take 18-36 months for funding to become available in some instances to rebuild a school. that's too long. can you imagine a community going three years, you know, without even getting their school started? i mean, i realize that sometimes it takes a long time to build things, but you don't want to just wait three years before you start. so the way that we do it now without spending any more money, it's just allowing them to -- the federal government to push out some of the front money to the locals, they can then get started and of course they will reimburse the federal government. so that is a very smart reform that's in there. in addition, we also provide grants on the basis of a reliable fixed estimate for expedited removal of storm debris. this approach will be faster, cheaper
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4